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August 2022: Ocular melanoma and protons - protect your skin and eyes - ocular patient David - Jen PA-C Newsletter (view the full email campaign)

Controlling eye cancers with proton therapy

Controlling eye cancers with proton therapy

There are many treatment options for ocular cancers, including surgery, laser and brachytherapy, depending on the size of the tumor. But because of where ocular cancers are located — near the brain — they are uniquely suited to be treated with the precision of protons.

Protect your eyes and skin from the sun

Protect your eyes and skin from the sun

It’s a well-known fact that the ultraviolet (UV) rays emitted by the sun can damage our skin and eyes. Ultraviolet radiation can alter the cells in our bodies and cause cancers, including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma (skin cancer) and conjunctival cancer. It can also cause cataracts and macular degeneration. This is why it’s extremely important to protect your skin and eyes from the sun, year-round.

David chose proton therapy for his ocular melanoma

David chose proton therapy for his ocular melanoma

When David began having problems seeing his computer screens at work, he decided it was time for glasses. At his eye exam, he decided to get a digital eye scan, which he had heard was a good idea. The optometrist recommended that he see a retinal specialist because there appeared to be a scratch on his eye. The retinal specialist did more scans, injected dye and even did an ultrasound. When the doctor came in to review the results, the diagnosis was sobering: There was a mass on David’s eye.

Meet Jen Flanner, PA-C

Meet Jen Flanner, PA-C

Jen Flannery, our physician assistant, helps build and nurture the prostate survivorship program, which means she sees patients in follow-up clinics and helps with any urgent care needs. She will also develop programs for survivors, such as the Prostate Dinner Club, a monthly gathering of past, current and prospective proton therapy patients and their partners.